Monday, October 3, 2011

HIV ATRIPLA MEDICATION

Atripla (a-trip-la) is a medicine which is used in HIV infection and preventing transmission of HIV infection from mother to baby during pregnancy. Atripla contains tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/efavirenz/emtricitabine. It is supplied by Gilead Sciences Ltd.The information in this Medicine Guide for Atripla varies according to the condition being treated and the particular preparation used.
Your medicine

Atripla is an anti-HIV medicine that is used in the treatment of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It contains three medicines–efavirenz, emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

HIV weakens the body's immune system and reduces the body's ability to fight infections. Anti-HIV medicines do not kill the virus but they slow down or stop the HIVvirus from making copies of itself. This allows the body's immune system to keep working and gives the body a chance to fight other infections. Anti-HIV medicines do not cure HIV infections or prevent you from getting other infections.

Anti-HIV medicines are most effective when taken in combination with other anti-HIV-medicines. Combination therapy reduces the chances of the virus becoming resistant to a single medicine. Resistance to medicines makes HIV treatment more difficult. For HIV therapy to be effective and to reduce the chances of developing resistance to your medicine, it is important you take the full daily dose and take your medicines exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Some people with hepatitis Binfection may find that their infection becomes worse when they stop taking Atripla. Your prescriber may arrange for you to have tests to monitor your hepatitis for at least four months after stopping treatment with Atripla.

Treatment with anti-HIV medicines does not reduce the risk of passing the virus on to other people through sexual contact or through contact with blood. It is important you take precautions against passing HIV to other people.

Women who are infected with HIV should not breast-feed their babies as the virus may be passed to the baby.

Do not share your medicine with other people. It may not be suitable for them and may harm them.

The pharmacy label on your medicine tells you how much medicine you should take. It also tells you how often you should take your medicine. This is the dose that you and your prescriber have agreed you should take. You should not change the dose of your medicine unless you are told to do so by your prescriber.

If you feel that the medicine is making you unwell or you do not think it is working, then talk to your prescriber.
Whether this medicine is suitable for you

Atripla is not suitable for everyone and some people should never use it. Other people should only use it with special care. It is important that the person prescribing this medicine knows your full medical history.

Whether this medicine is suitable for you

Atripla is not suitable for everyone and some people should never use it. Other people should only use it with special care. It is important that the person prescribing this medicine knows your full medical history.

Your prescriber may only prescribe this medicine with special care or may not prescribe it at all if you:

are aged over 65 years
are allergic or sensitive to or have had a reaction to any of the ingredients in the medicine
are on a diet which must be low in sodium from all sources, including medicines
have had skin problems such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome after taking non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors
have liver problems or have risk factors for developing liver problems such as if you have hepatitis B or C infection, drink alcohol heavily or are a female and are overweight
have metabolic problems
have or have had kidney problems
have or have had psychiatric problems such as depression
have or have had seizures
have or have had thoughts of committing suicide or have attempted suicide
have recently taken medicines that damage the kidney
have risk factors for developing kidney problems
have risk factors for developing lipodystrophy syndrome

Furthermore the prescriber may only prescribe this medicine with special care or may not prescribe it at all for someone under 18 years of age.

As part of the process of assessing suitability to take this medicine a prescriber may also arrange tests:

to determine whether or not the medicine is suitable and whether it must be prescribed with extra care
to check that this medicine is not having any undesired effects

Over time it is possible that Atripla can become unsuitable for some people, or they may become unsuitable for it. If at any time it appears that Atripla has become unsuitable, it is important that the prescriber is contacted immediately.
Alcohol

Alcohol can interact with certain medicines.

In the case of Atripla:

there are no known interactions between alcohol and Atripla

Diet

Medicines can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your prescriber may advise you to avoid certain foods.

In the case of Atripla:

this medicineinteracts with grapefruit juice. Grapefruit juice may affect the level of Atripla in your blood

For more advice speak to your prescriber, nutritionist or pharmacist.
Driving and operating machinery

When taking any medicine you should be aware that it might interfere with your ability to drive or operate machinery safely.

In the case of Atripla:

this medicine could affect your ability to drive or operate machinery

You should see how this medicine affects you before you judge whether you are safe to drive or operate machinery. If you are in any doubt about whether you should drive or operate machinery, talk to your prescriber.
Family planning and pregnancy

Most medicines, in some way, can affect the development of a baby in the womb. The effect on the baby differs between medicines and also depends on the stage of pregnancy that you have reached when you take the medicine.

In the case of Atripla:

children born to mothers who took Atripla during pregnancy may need regular check-ups
you should only take this medicine during pregnancy if your doctor thinks that you need it
your prescriber will only start your treatment with Atripla once they are certain that you are not pregnant. For more information talk to your prescriber
if you are taking Atripla and you could become pregnant, you must use effective non-hormonal contraception or abstain from penetrative sex during treatment and for at least 12 weeks after stopping Atripla
this medicine may make hormonal contraceptives such as oral contraceptives less effective. If this could affect you, it is important that you also use effective non-hormonal contraception

You need to discuss your specific circumstances with your doctor to weigh up the overall risks and benefits of taking this medicine. You and your doctor can make a decision about whether you are going to take this medicine during pregnancy.

If the decision is that you should not have Atripla, then you should discuss whether there is an alternative medicine that you could take during pregnancy.
Breast-feeding

Certain medicines can pass into breast milk and may reach your baby through breast-feeding.

In the case of Atripla:

women who are taking Atripla should not breast-feed
women who are infected with HIV should not breast-feed their babies as the virus may be passed to the baby

Before you have your baby you should discuss breast-feeding with your doctor or midwife. They will help you decide what is best for you and your baby based on the benefits and risks associated with this medicine.

2 comments:

  1. if you have a sign for HIV you sure get test , no matter what is going on .

    ReplyDelete